Nevada Day TreasureHunt

In October 2006 a friend and I stood within the confines of a small park. The Nevada Day Treasure Hunt medallion had been found there the day before.  We had spent two weeks solving clues, researching, and visiting anywhere we thought the medallion may have been hidden.  Standing there I was in awe of those individuals who had taken the time to provide myself and others an adventure in which I could learn about, experience, and enjoy the place I call home.  From then on I was hooked, and over the years my family came to understand that the month of October was dedicated to the Hunt.  Schedules and vacations were arranged so that we all would be available.  Emails, and later texts, would fly amongst us solving clues and proclaiming possible hiding spots. One of my daughters became as obsessed as I and each year we spent day in and day out in October hunting until the medallion was found.  Several times we were close to finding the medallion ourselves, once close enough to even hold the medallion after hearing someone ten feet in front of us yell “I found it.”

The first Nevada Day Treasure Hunt was held in October 2000.  It was the creation of the Olson family, who had moved into the area from Oregon.  While living in Oregon they had enjoyed the annual Portland Rose Festival Treasure Hunt.  After relocating to Nevada, they found themselves missing the fun and adventure of that hunt and decided to undertake the task of creating a similar hunt here in Northern Nevada.  The family organized and held thirteen hunts.  They recruited businesses to donate services and/or support.  One of their biggest sponsors was the Nevada Appeal, which agreed to print the clues daily and be designated as the location for returning the medallion once found.  As a result of the Olson’s dedication, the Nevada Day Treasure Hunt grew in popularity and became a Northern Nevada tradition that myself and others awaited all year long. 

In 2014, the Olson family announced they were retiring from the Hunt.  After contemplating an October without hunting and discussing the pros and cons of assuming the responsibility, my family contacted the Olsons and offered to carry on this tradition. With their endorsement, it is now my family’s honor to hold the annual Hunt.  We only hope we can meet their dedication and provide as great an adventure for hunters that they provided for us for so many years. 
                                                                                                           

Trish Mahe